When California water supplies were cut off by climate change, water shortages were ‘normal’

California was under a water shortage after its state legislature decided to ban all new wells in November 2016.

Now, the state is struggling to supply residents with drinking water, with many in the city of Forney, California, struggling to find drinking water.

In 2016, the California State Water Resources Control Board decided that all new water wells should be drilled at the lowest possible rate of 3,500 cubic metres per second (cfs), or 2,000 times less than the maximum rate of 5,500 cfs required for the safe operation of the state’s oldest aqueducts.

The ban was widely criticised, with critics saying it would force Californians to endure the worst drought since the state was founded in 1858.

However, in Forney residents are facing a new water crisis as water supplies are drying up.

“The last two years have been extremely dry and we have seen that the groundwater is going dry and the aquifers are getting more dry.” “

The water crisis was exacerbated by the drought, with more than half of the water in the state being used for irrigation. “

The last two years have been extremely dry and we have seen that the groundwater is going dry and the aquifers are getting more dry.”

The water crisis was exacerbated by the drought, with more than half of the water in the state being used for irrigation.

The aquifer contains an estimated 1.8 trillion cubic metres of water, and it is estimated that a third of it has already been depleted.

The Forney water crisis is affecting residents in a different way, as it is affecting the local economy.

In the past year, Forney has experienced a sharp drop in the number of people visiting the town, which is home to about 200 businesses.

The water shortage has also affected tourism in the area.

Tourism from California has dropped to just $30,000 (£18,000) in 2018 from $180,000 in 2016.

The economic impact is not only a financial loss, as Forney relies on the sale of water for its electricity generation, but also a loss of employment in the local tourism industry.

Al Jazeera’s Tom Bohn reports.